elementary

Fix Incorrect Clock Settings in Windows When Dual-Booting With Elementary OS

Fix Incorrect Clock Settings in Windows When Dual-Booting With Elementary OS

Switching between Elementary OS and Windows, I noticed that the Time was not set correctly.  This is mostly caused by Windows and Linux using two different ways of setting time. Linux sets the computers time to the RealTimeClock and then applies the timezone. While Windows simply sets the computers clock to the TimeZone you are currently in.

The classic way of fixing this issue is, changing some value in the Registry. However I use a different – more native to Windows method by using the already existing “Synchronize Time” Task and adding a trigger to ensure that it runs at logon.

Step 1:  Open Task Scheduler

Open the “Task Scheduler” (Press the Windows Key and Type Task Scheduler)

Navigate to the Folder Task Scheduler Library/Microsoft/Windows/Time Synchronisation

Step 2: Set up Trigger

Rightclick on the task “Synchronize Time” > Preferences2016-12-01-00_33_40-nvidia-geforce-overlay

Step 3: Set up a new Trigger

Navigate to the Tab “Triggers” and click on “New”

In the Dialog Box Select Begin the task: “At Log on”

2016-12-01-00_35_47-task-scheduler

 

Now the clock should always be set to the correct time whenever you log on.

 

Posted by happyneal in Linux, Windows, 0 comments
Elementary OS: Windows Apps with Play on Linux

Elementary OS: Windows Apps with Play on Linux

One of the major issues when using Linux is that you would like to use Software that was written for Windows. Thankfully more and more new Software is cross-platform compatible. However especially older Software and most newer Games will not support Linux.

If you are dependent on using Windows Software then you have several options available. Dual-Boot Windows and Linux, use a Virtual Machine (like VirtualBox or try  WineHQ

Wine essentially translates the Windows Commands to Linux Commands at run-time. Eliminating the penalty of using a virtual machine. The downside of Wine is, that not all new programs run properly. However it seems games that were written for Windows XP work better with Wine than with Windows 10.

The last time I was playing with Linux I found it very difficult to configure and find packages. You need wine, wine-tricks, then install some other windows package into wine etc.  This time I found another project Play on Linux that provides an easy to use GUI with quick Installers for many different programs.

The other thing which makes “Play on Linux” great, is that it can create multiple virtual drives, for your various programs. So you can use different versions of Wine, or configure the different drives to emulate a different version of Windows, use different components etc.

Install Play on Linux

wget -q "http://deb.playonlinux.com/public.gpg" -O- | sudo apt-key add -
sudo wget http://deb.playonlinux.com/playonlinux_trusty.list -O /etc/apt/sources.list.d/playonlinux.list
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install playonlinux

Battle.net games

Play on Linux shines the most when it already provides an installer that automatically configures Wine correctly to install all components that the program simply runs without any additional work.

You just locate Hearthstone, Diablo or Starcraft from the list and press install and the program will work without any issues.

Windows Steam Games

Step 1

Install Windows Steam. Play on Linux provides easy installers for Steam, simply search for steam in the installer menu and press install.

selection_001

Installer for Steam

 

Step 2

You will have to look up in the Wine AppDB if your game is supported by Wine.

If it is supported you then can log into steam and install games from your library just like in windows.

Step 3

Usually you will need to install some sort of additional windows package to get the program running.

In my case I wanted to install Tron 2.0, in the documentation for the program. Something like needs “winetricks directmusic” was mentioned.

To install “directmusic” you need to select Steam and click on Configure. Then switch to the Install components Tab and then select the component from the list and press install.

selection_003

Install a missing component

 

In some cases, like with my Tron 2.0 example, this is not enough and you have to google some more to find some helpful [article] (http://www.gamersonlinux.com/forum/threads/tron-2-0-guide.628/) that then tells you to install additional components  and not to use the Windows XP emulation but the Windows 7 emulation.

Custom Installers

Of course you may have your own Programs, you can simply click on “Install non-listed program” navigate to the installation files and install your program.

Access to Files

Play on Linux installs a handy shortcut into your home directory, so that you can easily access the various virtual hardrives of the Play on Linux instances, if you have the need to copy&modify files.

 

Conclusion

While Wine is not perfect and not everything runs smoothly and out of the box like when using Windows directy. It is worth fiddling around with Wine/Play on Linux to not have to dual boot or get a VM running.

 

 

 

Posted by happyneal in Blog, Linux, 0 comments
Elementary OS: Loki

Elementary OS: Loki

Elementary OS is a new Operating System that wants to be an alternative to Window or OSX. The team behind the project puts an high emphasis on Usability and Design.

Over the next couple of days I will try to actually switch to the system. Elementary is based on Ubuntu, which in turn is based on Debian, so all *.deb packages and programs can be installed without any problems. As with all Linux Distributions Elementary is free. However the developers require you to think about it if you would like to support their efforts or not. If not you enter a 0 into the download field.

For my initial setup I will essentially install all the common programs I use on a day to day basis. .

How To install Elementary.io

Step 1 Download the ISO

Go to www.elementary.io and download the current Version. If you have some money to spare you can donate to the project. If not enter a 0 and you can download the iso for free.

Step 2: Prepare a USB Stick

Go to https://rufus.akeo.ie/ and download the Rufus tool, this allows you to easily create a bootable USB stick.

Step 3: Install

Well for the last step you really just have to boot from the stick and follow the instructions.

First Steps

Remove Default Programs

The team focuses a lot on providing a suite of programs that also follow it’s design principles.

I would prefer to use Chrome as my Browser, and VideoLan for videos and I do not need an email client, or a dedicated calendar.  I removed them with these commands:

sudo apt remove pantheon-mail -y
sudo apt remove maya-calendar -y
sudo apt remove epiphany-browser -y
sudo apt remove audience -y

(The program “audience” is the default VideoPlayer)

Install General Programs

Chrome

Since Chrome has some Google stuff in it you first have to add it to apt with this command:

wget -q -O - https://dl-ssl.google.com/linux/linux_signing_key.pub | sudo apt-key add -
sudo sh -c 'echo "deb [arch=amd64] http://dl.google.com/linux/chrome/deb/ stable main" >> /etc/apt/sources.list.d/google-chrome.list'
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install google-chrome-stable

VideoLan

To install VideoLan simply enter following command:

sudo apt-get install vlc -y

Skype

Microsoft has just recently announced that they will create a Skype Client for Linux. For now there is only the official “Skype for Linux Alpha”. Essentially the program is still barebones and is in very early stages of development. – If you install  it do not expect that everything will be working.


wget https://go.skype.com/skypeforlinux-64-alpha.deb
sudo dpkg -i skypeforlinux-64-alpha.deb

Shortcuts

⌘+Space App Launcher
Alt+Tab Window Switcher
⇧+Alt+Tab Switch Windows Backwards
⌘+Left/Right Switch Workspace
⌘+S Workspace Overview
Ctrl+⌘+Left/Right Snap Window to Half of Workspace
Ctrl+⌘+Up/Down Maximize/Unmaximize Window
⌘+T Terminal

Conclusion

The OS looks awesome, it feels like a system you actually could work with for a longer period of time. In the past I have always tried Linux for a couple of days and then said, well interesting, but a lot of my programs simply do not work and I would like to go back to Windows.

Let’s see how long this time the experiment is going to last and if Linux has become more user friendly over time.

Posted by happyneal in Blog, Linux, 0 comments